Main Content

Treeing Tennessee Brindle

(Tennessee Treeing Brindle)
  • Save search for breed
Treeing Tennessee Brindle

Form and Function

A smart, brave, loyal member of the Hound group, the Treeing Tennessee Brindle has energy to spare but can be mellow and relaxed at home when his needs are met. His short, smooth and low shedding coat make grooming time a breeze, although regular brushing and nail trims are suggested. A generally healthy breed, the Treeing Tennessee Brindle dog loves activity and training and can excel at competitive dog sports. However, this dog’s strong prey drive can mean families with other small animals are advised to proceed cautiously when adding a TTB to their family.

Are you someone who is always on the go and loves the outdoors? The Treeing Tennessee Brindle might be your perfect match.

Breed Traits

Energy Level

4 out of 5

Exercise Requirements

4 out of 5

Playfulness

3 out of 5

Affection Level

4 out of 5

Friendliness To Dogs

4 out of 5

Friendliness To Other Pets

3 out of 5

Friendliness To Strangers

3 out of 5

Watchfulness

2 out of 5

Ease of Training

3 out of 5

Grooming Requirements

2 out of 5

Heat Sensitivity

3 out of 5

Vocality

4 out of 5

Breed Attributes

Type

Hound

Weight

30-50 lbs.

Height

16”-24”

Family

Foundation Stock Service

Area of Origin

Appalachian Mountains, Ozark Mountains, areas in between

Date of Origin

1960s

Other Names

Tennessee Treeing Brindle

History

Although similar to the Plott Hound breed, the Treeing Tennessee Brindle has a smaller stature and shorter ear. Traced back to the 1960s in the United States, this is a newer breed, originally bred to “tree” animals while hunting.

Temperament

Combining a strong, baying voice with a highly-skilled nose, the Treeing Tennessee Brindle is a versatile dog that would do best with an active pet parent.

Smart, intelligent, loyal and fast are some of the traits used to describe the Treeing Tennessee Brindle (TTB). Their innate desire to be outdoors on an adventure makes this a great dog for people who love nature, active families, experienced pet parents and those who don’t mind a dog that bays at the moon.

Though TTBs are tried and true outdoor lovers, they also love to be a part of their pack, no matter how big or small. Camping, hiking and some snuggling on the couch or at their parent’s feet are all things the Treeing Tennessee Brindle likes to do. Despite a high energy drive, the TTB is laid back and friendly and makes an excellent companion dog for the right person.

Families that have other small animals should be cautious, given the Treeing Tennessee Brindle’s strong desire to give chase. Their vocal and boisterous natures make training that involves rewarding quiet behavior a good idea for anyone living with a TTB. Luckily, these dogs are often highly food-motivated, so positive-based rewards with treats can go a long way.

Regular activities shared with their pack will help strengthen the bond between dog and pet parent. If you have an interest in competitive dog sports, like agility, a Treeing Tennessee Brindle might be a good dog to have at your side. Exercise has other benefits as well. It will keep the TTB’s weight in check, and he is happy to rest at his family’s feet after a fun day spent outdoors or engaging in some form of exercise.

Upkeep

The TTB’s short, smooth coat prevents the need for expensive haircuts and removes any worry about matting. Regular, gentle grooming helps this low-shedding dog shine and stay healthy. The TTB does best with weekly light brushing with a soft-bristled brush. Their nails may have dewclaws, so like all dogs, regular nail clipping is required. An occasional bath and checking for ear-wax building is also a good idea. Because they love to be outside, always check for ticks, fleas and any other critters that may claim your TTB as their host.

The TTB will thrive on proper high-quality dog food. Make sure to keep weight in check by not overfeeding with food or excessive treats.

Regular veterinary care is a must, of course, but the TTB breed is known for being robust and hardy. Hip and eye checks are always a good idea, but the breed isn’t known to have specific health concerns.

Health

The TTB’s short, smooth coat prevents the need for expensive haircuts and removes any worry about matting. Regular, gentle grooming helps this low-shedding dog shine and stay healthy. The TTB does best with weekly light brushing with a soft-bristled brush. Their nails may have dewclaws, so like all dogs, regular nail clipping is required. An occasional bath and checking for ear-wax building is also a good idea. Because they love to be outside, always check for ticks, fleas and any other critters that may claim your TTB as their host.

The TTB will thrive on proper high-quality dog food. Make sure to keep weight in check by not overfeeding with food or excessive treats.

Regular veterinary care is a must, of course, but the TTB breed is known for being robust and hardy. Hip and eye checks are always a good idea, but the breed isn’t known to have specific health concerns.

Disclaimer

Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary. Please consult the adoption organization for details on a specific pet.

Finding Treeing Tennessee Brindle Dog Breeds for You...

Do you have a dog?

Organizations with Treeing Tennessee Brindle Dog Breeds

Organizations with Treeing Tennessee Brindle Dog Breeds