Happy Tail: Old blind Dachshund is a woman’s blessing

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For several weeks, Wendy Jones had been daydreaming over a longhaired Dachshund named Talia, listed on Petfinder by Peace for Paws Ohio.

“I was at a terrible point in my life and was sad and depressed,” says the Columbus, Ohio, woman. She thought a dog would help her feel better. “I have always searched rescue sites randomly and knew that when I found the right dog, I would know it.”

Talia still looks like a puppy.

Talia still looks like a puppy.

And when she saw Talia, it happened. “I fell in love instantly. I turned her picture into the wallpaper on my laptop and would look at her very day.”

The dog was 12 and blind, two strikes against her finding a new home after her previous owner surrendered her. But that didn’t faze Wendy. “I felt she needed me as much as I needed her.”

As soon as her landlord gave approval, Wendy and her boyfriend headed for a mega-adoption event in which the rescue was participating. “We arrived at the event, and I walked through it twice. There was no sign of her or her shelter, so with my bottom lip sticking out, we left. Just after we pulled out of the parking lot, I asked my boyfriend if we could go back and look one more time.”

He agreed, and this time, “I asked people where her shelter group was. Someone pointed me to the right people, and I asked one of the volunteers if she knew anything about Talia.” The woman didn’t recognize the name but did remember that one of the volunteers was fostering a blind dog.

Wendy made contact and emailed back and forth. The shelter did a background check, and then the foster person brought the dog for a home visit. When Wendy asked how long the adoption was going to take, the woman asked how soon Wendy would like to have her. “Now!” Wendy replied. The woman had her sign the papers, and the adoption was finalized right then.

Nowadays, Wendy and Talia are almost inseparable. The dog loves to sit on Wendy’s lap and, “even though she is blind and older, she still loves to play with her squeaky toys until she ‘kills’ them,” Wendy says. “When I open the refrigerator door she stands there as if she is looking for something to eat. If I ask her if she wants to go for a ride, she will go stand beside the door.” Her blindness doesn’t hold her back.

Wendy counts Talia as a blessing in her life, and surely Wendy is that for Talia as well.