NODROG Gordon Setter Club of Michigan Inc.

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HELP! DONATIONS NEEDED FOR DUNCAN'S SURGERY

WWW.thebettersetter.com

GORDON IN NEED Holly adopted Duncan from the Nodrog Gordon Setter Club of Michigan in 2002. She has since gotten divorced and is going through hard times. Through these hard times, her dogs are her rock and are the only thing getting her through. A group of concerned Setter people would like to help out. Below is a Donate Button. The money will be going to my PayPal account (Mackenziedream Specialty Show Services) to donate to Holly for Duncan's surgery to remove a tumor on his eye. I know giving your money to some PayPal account is something you normally wouldn't do. Feel free to copy your receipt and send it to Holly, Cindy Baatz or Sarah Armstrong to verify that indeed the money did go to the Holly fund. An online autction is in the works, so come back and bid on an item!!! Thank you so much for your help. ~~ Jan Ruggles, Cindy Baatz & Sarah Armstrong

EVENTS

ANIMAL MANIA GORDON SETTER COLORING

News

THE WINGER STORY

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When asked, we can all reflect on the Gordon Setters that we have loved and known over the years—every one of them with unique personalities and idiosyncrasies. I guess that’s why we love them so. But, when everything is said and done, there usually is one Gordon that touches a chord within us in a very special way. The story that I’m about to relay is about one such Gordon who positively touched everyone that he interacted with.
My story begins with a phone call I received from a fellow GSCA member stating that she had been contacted by an area animal shelter. They had a Gordon Setter there who was relinquished by his owner because he “didn’t get along” with the younger dog in the family. Furthermore, this Gordon Setter was 12 years old and blind. I’m guessing that your reaction is probably like mine was at the time— one of anger and sadness. I still question to this day how anyone in good conscience could relinquish a 12 year old blind dog to a shelter? Well, needless to say, “Winger” was sprung from the shelter and fostered over the next several months by a few members of the Nodrog Gordon Setter Club in Michigan, including myself. So, how does one take care of a blind dog? That is a very good question. With that said, the foster parents researched the topic on the Internet. Caring for a blind dog required that we make a few adjustments—it was a whole new experience. The one conclusion we all agreed on was that Winger had a “whole lot of heart” as well as the determination and desire to adapt to new surroundings. It was that spirit that we all found infectious and uplifting. At times you could sense his frustrations, but he quickly overcame them just through our talking to him. As with any Gordon Setter, Winger’s primary desire was one of acceptance by and devotion to a new family. “What an appropriate name,” I thought—a perfect fit for his personality and demeanor. But, the question was “Who would be willing to adopt a 12 year old Gordon Setter, especially one that is blind?” Well, our prayers were answered by a gracious and benevolent couple who lived in the Pacific Northwest. They had seen Winger on Petfinder.com and felt that he would be a welcome addition to their family. “What a wonderful and generous thing to do,” I thought. “These truly are very compassionate and special people.” That led us to our next big hurdle—how do we get Winger out to his new adoptive family in Oregon? We originally had made plans to transport him with a GSCA member who had planned to drive from the west coast to Pennsylvania for the National Specialty, but those plans fell through. The next idea that we entertained was flying him via a commercial carrier from Michigan to Portland, Oregon, but concluded the flight would be far too stressful for Winger. We also talked about transporting him via a relay of several GSCA members who were heading to the National Field Trials in Seattle, Washington, but again worried that it would prove too stressful for Winger. I had also contacted several other rescue groups to inquire if they had any dogs that they were transporting to the Pacific northwest, but did not have any luck. We explored several other options including a trucker transport called “On the Road Again” but nothing panned out. Winger’s new adoptive family said that they would be willing to drive and meet us somewhere halfway between Michigan and Oregon. Folks who know me appreciate how much I enjoy a good road trip and, with that said, I made the decision to drive Winger out west. After some discussion with Winger’s adoptive family, we mutually agreed upon North Platte, Nebraska as our meeting spot. With the trunk packed, a tank full of gas, a full cup of coffee, and dogs in tow, I left early in the morning. Omaha was a good 750 miles from my house and I wanted to be there by early DECEMBER 2008, #663 21 in particular, the top of the bed. That evening, we all slept on the bed and got up early the next morning for the final leg of the trip. We arrived in North Platte late morning and I met Marty for breakfast. As I learned a little more about Marty and his family, I thought that Winger would not only be welcome in their home, but spoiled like he deserved to be. After a brief walk following breakfast, Winger was put into the back of Marty’s SUV. He couldn’t get enough of the new smells. After some comforting words from Marty, Winger was on his way to his new home in Oregon. The drive back to Michigan was rather sublime for me and seemed to be one of the longest ones I’ve ever made. That special Gordon who had touched so many people was now on his way to his new home with a truly dedicated, loving, and compassionate family. Thank you, Winger, for touching so many lives, including my own, and for being such a grand old Scottish gentleman. I am thinking about you and missing you. —Mark Szlaczky (MI) Mark recently spoke to Marty and found out that Winger is doing just great. He has already figured out the layout of his new house and backyard. Marty takes Winger for several walks each day. Winger is very confident on a leash and likes to walk right out in front; if you didn’t know any better, you wouldn’t think that he was blind. On behalf of the Gordon Setter fancy, our thanks and gratitude are extended to Mark, Nodrog Gordon Setter Club, and Marty for this happy ending! —Ed. evening. (I told you I like a good road trip.) On the morning I headed out, it was raining and I knew that I would be driving through some storms that were passing through the midwest. Trust me, this road trip wasn’t disappointing—the colors of the fall leaves were simply spectacular. Once we got out of Illinois and into Iowa, the landscape had changed—not too many trees anymore, but lots and lots of corn. It was interesting to see how many of the farmers had started combining the corn. The scenery changed again once we got into western Iowa and Omaha. The hilly terrain was a welcome sight. I couldn’t wait to check in to the motel and rest. I knew the following day I would be putting on another 300 miles before reaching North Platte. Winger, during the entire trip, pretty much slept in the back seat. He would get up for the occasional stop and stretch his legs only to quickly return to the back seat and fall asleep. Winger managed to find his way around the motel room and, Marty meetsmembers of the Nodrog Gordon Setter Club in Michigan, including myself. So, how does one take care of a blind dog? That is a very good question. With that said, the foster parents researched the topic on the Internet. Caring for a blind dog required that we make a few adjustments—it was a whole new experience. The one conclusion we all agreed on was that Winger had a “whole lot of heart” as well as the determination and desire to adapt to new surroundings. It was that spirit that we all found infectious and uplifting. At times you could sense his frustrations, but he quickly overcame them just through our talking to him. As with any Gordon Setter, Winger’s primary desire was one of acceptance by and devotion to a new family. “What an appropriate name,” I thought—a perfect fit for his personality and demeanor. But, the question was “Who would be willing to adopt a 12 year old Gordon Setter, especially one that is blind?” Well, our prayers were answered by a gracious and benevolent couple who lived in the Pacific Northwest. They had seen Winger on Petfinder.com and felt that he would be a welcome addition to their family. “What a wonderful and generous thing to do,” I thought. “These truly are very compassionate and special people.” That led us to our next big hurdle—how do we get Winger out to his new adoptive family in Oregon? We originally had made plans to transport him with a GSCA member who had planned to drive from the west coast to Pennsylvania for the National Specialty, but those plans fell through. The next idea that we entertained was flying him via a commercial carrier from Michigan to Portland, Oregon, but concluded the flight would be far too stressful for Winger. We also talked about transporting him via a relay of several GSCA members who were heading to the National Field Trials in Seattle, Washington, but again worried that it would prove too stressful for Winger. I had also contacted several other rescue groups to inquire if they had any dogs that they were transporting to the Pacific northwest, but did not have any luck. We explored several other options including a trucker transport called “On the Road Again” but nothing panned out. Winger’s new adoptive family said that they would be willing to drive and meet us somewhere halfway between Michigan and Oregon. Folks who know me appreciate how much I enjoy a good road trip and, with that said, I made the decision to drive Winger out west. After some discussion with Winger’s adoptive family, we mutually agreed upon North Platte, Nebraska as our meeting spot. With the trunk packed, a tank full of gas, a full cup of coffee, and dogs in tow, I left early in the morning. Omaha was a good 750 miles from my house and I wanted to be there by early DECEMBER 2008, Winger

Who We Are

NODROG Gordon Setter Rescue is an organization founded by the NODROG Gordon Setter Club Inc. It is a non-profit program that is comprised of an all volunteered staff. Rescue is supported by a national breed club, the Gordon Setter Club of America, Inc. While the membership of the club are concerned with the well being of all animals, they recognize that they can't save all who are unwanted, abandoned or abused. By taking care of its own breed it can help control the overall problem. Funding for our program is accomplished by donations, fund-raiser events and membership drives. All revenue collected is used to defray the cost of each dog that comes to NODROG Rescue program.

Adopting a friend

To begin your venture of looking for just the right Gordon Setter you will need to write us for an application. Prospective adopters are thoroughly screened prior to setting up appointments for adoptions. Once your application is returned, completely filled out, we will start the interview process. First, each of your references will be called, including your Veterinarian. Once that is done we will call you for a phone interview. In the phone interview we talk about your past pet experiences and discuss the preferences of your family. We will set up a home visit and you will be on your way to adopting your very own Gordon Setter.

Come Visit Us!


NODROG Gordon Setter Club of Michigan Inc.


Hazel Park, MI 48030
Phone:

Email:
dogonegold@aol.com
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