About Us

News

11-18-14 updates:

NEW video! 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqdmJeEwnQg&feature=youtu.be


BFRR is moving (eventually-- we're currently in the repair stage), so will not be able to take in any rabbits for a while.

Please see http://www.rabbit.org for the very best info on rabbit behavior, care, and how to build a working relationship with your bunny that will be beneficial to you and bunny.

Litter training, preventing nibbling on furniture, bunny proofing your home, what your rabbit needs, why s/he acts like s/he does, etc, are all discussed at www.rabbit.org.


If you find "orphaned" wild bunnies, LEAVE THEM ALONE. Cover nest with dry grasses or leaves and check it 24 hours later. If the covering has not moved at all, call a wildlife rehabilitator. It is illegal for us (or you) to take a wild animal from the wild, up to $1000 fine & 100 days in jail in WV. Pls see: http://www.rabbit.org/care/orphan.html


 

 

Fun at Morgantown Public Library teaching kids about house rabbit care!

 

See the transcript of WBOY-TV’s story of our first adoption day: "Bunny Feathers" Stresses Adoption of Rabbits in Foster Care

 

Silver jewelry of our logo bunny is being made by our friend Cheryl Titcher of Inspired Design in Newark, DE. www.etsy.com/shop/inspiredesigned; cherylgrove@hotmail.com

Adopting A Friend

Here is Petfinder's article on adopting rabbits: 

http://www.petfinder.com/before-pet-adoption/rabbits-as-pets.html

 

And here is our favorite house rabbit site: http://www.rabbit.org.

They have answers to any question you could think of about rabbit care.

Please take the time to do some serious research on this site before bringing Bunny home.

You'll be glad you did!  =:9)

 

Here's a fun article about rabbit personality types: http://www.bunnyhugga.com/rabbit-personality-list.html.

 

We are looking for:

* stable, permanent, indoor homes

* with responsible, caring people

* who are devoted to learning what rabbits need,

* have time to spend with them,

* and who can afford supplies, equipment, & vet care.

 

We want all members of the family--and the home owner (landlord/landlady)-- to approve of each adoption.

The most important thing in any rabbit adoption is the happiness of the rabbit with the adopter and vice versa. 

 

Rabbits are NOT good pets for children.

An adult must agree to be the rabbit's primary caretaker.

* Rabbits need as much care as dogs or cats.

* Rabbits communicate differently,

* are not as easy to train,

 *can't be punished (it only makes them scared or mean!),

* and need to be handled very gently.

 

Our Return Policy:

* If any rabbit that was adopted from us is ever unwanted or can't be kept by the adopter at any time during its life, for any reason, we will happily take the rabbit back if at all possible.

* If the adopter has moved far away, we can agree on an appropriate humane group to help re-home the rabbit.

*If you should find yourself in this position, please do not hesitate to contact us right away. There is no shame to admitting that you can't care for your pet or that you just aren't interested in him or her anymore. 

*We want what's best for the bunny. If you're not happy, the bunny won't be happy.

 

Adoption donations are sometimes negotiable.  Remember: 

* Our vets give us a discount.

* Each male costs us $80 to neuter.

* Each female costs us $130 to spay.  

* If you were to get an unaltered bunny elsewhere, you would need to pay this much or more to get your bunny altered.  

 

Please be humane: SPAY or NEUTER!

 

Why spay/neuter?

* If you do not get your rabbit altered, you are risking:

* pregnancy,

* aggressive & destructive behavior,

* urine marking,

* and reproductive tract cancers.

(80% of all unspayed females will get these cancers by age 5.)  

* There are too many unwanted rabbits in our area already, and our pounds/shelters do not usually accept them.

* Finding a good home for a rabbit is difficult. Most end up sad and neglected, in solitary confinement, in a hutch in a back yard. Most of those sad, lonely rabbits only live a year or so.  Yet rabbits are social animals and should live 5-10 years or more, depending on breed & other factors.

* Setting a domestic rabbit loose doesn't make them free, it makes them food.  

*If you want to experience the joys of birth and the fun of having a litter of baby bunnies, volunteer to be a foster parent for a pregnant rabbit.

 

For an adoption application, please e-mail bunny.feathers@comcast.net.

Thank you!

Who We Are

Bunny Feathers is a non-profit rescue and re-homing service. 

Why are we called "Bunny Feathers?" We used to be Bunny Haven, but there are at least 4 other Bunny Havens on bunspace, so we needed an unusual name. One of our vet's receptionists was petting one of our bunnies, and said,"He's as soft as feathers!" That was it! Bunny Feathers!

We have been helping bunnies for over 20 years.

Our logo was designed by Kim Sheets of The Sign Factory on the Mileground in Morgantown, WV. http://www.signfactorydirect.com

Come Visit Us

All of our bunnies are fostered in homes. 

Please e-mail bunny.feathers@comcast.net

for an appointment.

Thank you!

Contact Bunny Feathers Rabbit Resource





WV173

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