CUT BANK ANIMAL SHELTER



Cut Bank Animal Shelter
113 East Main
Cut Bank, MT 59427
406-873-2288 24/7
406-391-2273 ACO on duty
406-873-4624 adoptions only
406-873-2096 fax
Email: cutbankanimalshelter@hotmail.com
Click here for a list of pets at this shelter

Our Adoptable Pet List

Click here to see our Happy Tails!



All dogs kept, harbored or maintained in the City of Cut Bank shall be vaccinated and registered on or before the April 15, 2014. The fee for a spayed female or a neutered male dog is $5.00 paid annually with certified proof of Rabies vaccination present at time of registration. The fee for a non-spayed female or a non-neutered male dog is $10.00 paid annually with certified proof of Rabies vaccination present at time of registration. Dog Licenses are available at Cut Bank Police Department, 113 East Main, Monday- Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

MISSION STATEMENT:

Cut Bank Animal Control and Shelter shall promote the humane treatment of animals and foster respect, understanding and compassion for all creatures. We provide care and safe harbor for animals afflicted by neglect, abandonment and abuse. We will strive relentlessly to eradicate neglect, abandonment and abuse. We work to reunite lost animals with their owners. We are dedicated to lowering the numbers of animals needlessly destroyed due to overpopulation by promoting the spaying and neutering of ALL companion animals. We will endeavor relentlessly to enhance the bond between humans and animals through adoption, education and services for responsible, compassionate pet ownership.


OUR GOAL:

Helping the homeless and neglected animals of this community is number one on our list. (Check our statistics down below). As of September 9th, we have adopted 10 dogs,7 pups, 4 cats, and 6 kittens. We have returned to their owners 23 dogs, 6 pups and 1 cat. We assisted Fish, Wildlife and Game with wounded or injured animals.In 2013, we were asked to assist with raising an owlet until it was old enough to fly. Poor thing kept falling out of its nest. The parents provided the food, and we kept the owlet safe. The owlet is flying on its own and living in the city park with its parents. Our numbers may not sound like a lot but we are proud of them. The numbers tell us that the Spay/Neuter Clinics that we attend are reducing the number of animals in our community who would have probably met a horrible fate without the intervention of the Animal Control Officer, Special Services Officer and officers of the Cut Bank Police Department.


Our animals and the community need this service and we will work tirelessly to make this the best community for animals and humans alike. We cannot do this alone and need the help of kind, caring people. Help us to write happy endings to our adorable adoptables.


Most of our animals were surrendered because their caretakers were moving, divorced, developed allergies or died. Let your imagination go and share your life with a wonderful four-footed friend simply by opening your heart and your home. Knowing that you have kept that animal from being euthanized, which is sadly the reality of life in any shelter situation. It is the new family's job to provide attention, love and safe housing.





Year
Adopted
Returned to Owner
Assisted
Fish, Wildlife
& Game
Returned
to Nature

 

Dogs/Pups
Cats/Kittens
Ferret/Turtle
Dogs/Pups
Cats/Kittens
Rabbit
Owl/Hawk/
Eagle
Bat/Badger/
Woodpecker/
Morning
Dove/Hawk/
Porcupine/
Bull Snake/
Pigeon
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
52
84
51
45
11/22
18/33
10/17
17/27
9/16
6/13
10/7
20
98
76
49
12/35
14/34
20/16
24/25
49/32
12/8
4/6
 
 
 
 
 
 
1/0
0/1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
71
57/1
57/0
40/0
47/2
23/6
 
 
 
 
 
6
11/1
2/8
8/4
2/3
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1/3/1
 
0/2/0
 
 
3/0/0
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1/2/0/0/0/0/0
1/0/1/1/2/0/0
0/0/2/0/0/1/2
1/1/2/0/1/1/2/1
 
All dogs kept, harbored or maintained in the City of Cut Bank shall be vaccinated and registered on or before the 15th of April of each year. The fee for a spayed female or a neutered male dog is $15.00 paid annually with certified proof of Rabies vaccination present at time of registration. The fee for a non-spayed female or a non-neutered male dog is $20.00 paid annually with certified proof of Rabies vaccination present at time of registration. Dog Licenses are available at Cut Bank Police Department, 113 East Main, Monday- Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.About 4.7 million Americans are bitten by dogs each year, and 800,000 of those dog bites results in injuries that require medical attention.

PET LICENSES AND TAGS

Notice of Dog Registration


For Ordinance #6-3A-4, current licenses expire on December 31st of every year.


All dogs kept, harbored or maintained in the City of Cut Bank shall be vaccinated and registered on or before the 15th day of April of each year.


The owner shall state at the time of application for registration and upon printed forms provided for such purpose his/her name, address, and the name, breed, color, and sex of each dog owned or kept by him/her.


The new 2014 pet licenses are on sale at the same low rate with certified proof of Rabies vaccination present at time of registration.


City of Cut Bank Dog License

Cost

Type of Animal

$ 5.00

Spayed or Neutered Dog

$10.00

Unspayed or Unneutered Dog


Without a voice and without a tag, a lost pet may never find his way home.


Dog Licenses are available at Cut Bank Police Department, 113 East Main, Monday- Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.


Late charges of $10.00 will be assessed if the license fee is not paid by April 15th of the each year. If you have any questions, please contact Cut Bank Police Department at 873-2289.


Trying to reunited unidentified pets with their families consumes a huge amount of precious time and resources. Just think of how much shelter space would be available for legitimately homeless animals - and how many heartaches that would be avoided - if every owner equipped his or her pet with reliable identification.


Please do your pet, yourself and the Cut Bank Animal Shelter a favor. The cost is so minimal to the despair that we have seen this past year, because dogs did not have tags. All pups and dogs over the age of six months are required by city ordinance to have their rabies shots and a city license by April 15th each year.


Christmas Eve 2004, we received a call about an injured Spaniel, the dog was in severe shock after being attacked by another animal. We arrived and took her to the Shelter to try to do emergency first aid to the wounds. The dog did not have a city license. The vet tag was unreadable from wear. We called all licensed owners of Spaniels, vet techs and any one who owned licensed Spaniel in town.


It was a devastating Christmas morning when a vehicle stopped me on the way to the Shelter. They were missing their Spaniel. I had them follow me to the Shelter and to identify the one we had. The poor dog died about Midnight Christmas Day. Everyone had a cry and held each other. As I carried their dog to their vehicle, I noticed the children in the back seat. They burst into tears. It almost ripped my heart out.


It is heartbreaking for the owners of animals to have their pets missing, but equally heartbreaking for those of us in Animal Control and Rescue. Our hands are tied about getting treatment for an animal before contacting an owner. The heartbreak of a missing dog is a worry all pet owners share. It's best to think the unthinkable and do everything we can to provide proper identification for our dogs in the event they are lost or injured. A good dog collar with an ID tag or a City License is the first line of defense.


Please license your dogs to help us return your pet back home or to obtain medical treatment for your pet in an emergency situation. Licensing your pet is not meant to be punishment to you or your pet; it is meant to keep your pet safe. Your pets are counting on you to be there for them.


Identification is a lost pet's ticket home. But many pet lovers do not realize that tagging their pets not only gives them a voice, but also helps reduce the number of companion animals that end up in the country's over-burdened shelters every year.


Responsible ownership means being there for your pet even when you are not physically able to be there. Pet identification saves the lives of countless pets every year. Please help us to return your pet to you by having a tag on your animal if they are normally outside. Most animals that are found in Cut Bank have no identification. Some will by taken to the local veterinary clinics for identification. Some will be brought to the Animal Shelter. Which will your pet be?






I WANT TO HELP

I WANT TO HELP THE CUT BANK ANIMAL SHELTER

HELP THE COMMUNITY ANIMALS

I want to volunteer to:

Help with fund raising
Sponsor a kennel

I want to become a Sponsor:



$10 Individual (Yearly)
$15 Family (Yearly)
$50 Business (Yearly)

Name

Address

Phone

City

State

Zip

Return to: Cut Bank Animal Shelter, 113 East Main, Cut Bank, MT 59427-2918

Cut Bank Animal Shelter is an organization that is exempt from tax under section 501(a)13 - A governmental unit or affiliate of a governmental unit described in Rev. Proc. 95-48, 1995-2 C.B.418. CBAS is eligible to receive charitable contributions as a governmental unit described in Section 170(c)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code. The following categories of organization are included in Section 170(c)(1)" a state, a U.S. possession, a state or local governmental unit which is a municipal corporation or which has been delegated the right to exercise part of a sovereign power of the governmental unit, the United States, the District of Columbia, and Indian tribal governments. Contributions to CBAS are tax-deductible. Cut Bank Animal Shelter wants to thank you for your generous donation! Without your help and support, our shelter would not be able to adopt other animals in a loving forever home. It is with deepest honor that we accept your help in saving our community's animals.

WISH LIST

Kitten/Puppy Food

Cat/Dog Toys

Bleach

Cat Litter

Spay/Neuter Donations

Kitten Milk Replacer

Medical needs Donations

Dog Bones/Cat Treats

Hand Sanitizer

Fund Raising Volunteers and Ideas. Please help us help our community's animals!

Kuranda Beds for our cages (1-800-494-7122) Tell them you would like to donate a bed to Cut Bank's shelter.

If you think an animal needs it, we can use it! Donations are always accepted!

Cut Bank Animal Shelter is an organization that is exempt from tax under section 501(a)13 - A governmental unit or affiliate of a governmental unit described in Rev. Proc. 95-48, 1995-2 C.B.418. CBAS is eligible to receive charitable contributions as a governmental unit described in Section 170(c)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code. The following categories of organization are included in Section 170(c)(1)" a state, a U.S. possession, a state or local governmental unit which is a municipal corporation or which has been delegated the right to exercise part of a sovereign power of the governmental unit, the United States, the District of Columbia, and Indian tribal governments. Contributions to CBAS are tax-deductible. Cut Bank Animal Shelter wants to thank you for your generous donation! Without your help and support, our shelter would not be able to adopt other animals in a loving forever home. It is with deepest honor that we accept your help in saving our community's animals.


Imagine sleeping on a cement floor in the cold Cut Bank winters were the temperatures drop to -30 degrees without wind chill for six weeks at a time. We have chosen Kuranda beds for our Shelter because they are so good for our animals. We still don't have enough for all of our kennels. If you would like to donate a bed so another animal can sleep in proper comfort, please click here.

OUR FEATURED PETS





MacGyver is the official Shelter greeter. No one enters the Shelter without MacGyver giving them a loud greeting. Life isn't easy for an outdoor animal. MacGyver was left abandoned on the north side of Cut Bank in October 2004. Now, he can been found taking care of business at the Shelter.







Brianna is the quiet "Mother" figure of the Shelter. She interacts with the kittens and cats (no dogs for her, please!) Brianna was one of the kittens that Tina raised from a couple of days old to her adoption at eight weeks to a couple living at Malstrom. When they were transferred to Alaska, we gladly took Brianna back home with us in June 2010.










Wishful is one of our newest member of the Shelter family as of December 2011. He is learning the ropes from MacGyver about interacting with dogs and pups. Wishful has a very loud meow, which gets everyone's attention when you first enter the Shelter.



HEROISM



Two of our shelter dogs have been unsung heros who helped save other dogs; lives. "Had they not been there. The other dogs may not have made it," Tina Gauthier, a Shelter volunteer, said. "Colorado and Smartee are a example of "No greater love..." Today (June 2004 and May 2005) Colorado and Smartee donated blood to save other dogs that was in need of a transfusion to save their lives. Those who don't know may not realize how risky this procedure can be. Due to their acts of heroism, another animals were saved, and Colorado and Smartee were adopted. Colorado's and Smartee's new owners have a great deal to be proud of when they introduce them to their friends. Of course, we always knew that Colorado and Smartee were destined for greatness," Gauthier shared.


NEWS

Grant funds $60,000 in improvements to animal shelter


By Linda Bruch for the Cut Bank Pioneer Press
Wednesday, October 27, 2010 10:29 AM MDT

The building currently being used for the Cut Bank Animal Shelter was built during World War II, sometime around 1942. It was a simple garage, nothing more, nothing less and certainly nothing fancy.


In the early 1970s, the City of Cut Bank put that old garage to use as the animal shelter. It was still a garage with a few minor modifications, but it was serviceable.


Over the years, the shelter has seen some minor improvements, which has made it better, not great, but better. It still had the original roof, siding and garage-like interior and it was desperately in need of electrical work, new plumbing services, a laundry room, bathroom, cleaning room and storage areas.


Knowing the animal shelter was in need of a major facelift, Tina Gauthier decided to do some research on grants that might supply the money necessary to make the long overdue improvements to the building. She found just what the animal shelter needed: a grant administered by the Montana Department of Commerce that could net them the necessary funds to make a lot of improvements that were needed, inside and out.


Gauthier wrote the grant, submitted it and a check came for just over $60,000 and the work began on the Cut Bank Animal Shelter. Work on the shelter is now finished and what once was an old garage is now a better looking, more serviceable shelter for the unwanted, abandoned and lost animals of Cut Bank.


Dan Wilder was the contractor who performed the work on the animal shelter. He worked hand in hand with Tina and her husband, Joe Gauthier, Cut Bankís Animal Control Officer. Together they made all the improvements they could possibly get for the money they received. And together, they did a great job.


"We got a new roof. They took off the old siding and gave us new insulation and new siding and a new steel door too," said Joe. "We had them make it look a little like the other buildings in the area."


The interior of the original part of the shelter received a new dog wash area and some new plumbing and electrical work, which was desperately needed.


Last year, the city gave the animal shelter the garage stall that was right next to the shelter. It had been used as a storage area, but now, thanks to the grant money, it was completely renovated.


That space had new walls constructed, the ceiling lowered and was re-plumbed for a bathroom and a laundry area. "My previous laundry facility was a bucket with hot water and soap," said Joe.


The new area houses many of the stray or abandoned cats, keeping them separate from the dog kennels and runs that are in the original portion of the shelter. But the new space also serves as a storage area for a number of supplies the shelter needs to keep on hand. "With the grant money, we were able to buy a large locker that we can keep items in that we donít want to get too dusty or dirty," said Joe.


He continued, "In the new bathroom, we have a table where we can administer shots to the cats and dogs."


The space is more like what you would see in a public restroom for diaper changing, with a table that drops down from the wall. It works perfectly for what the shelter needs in order to provide the limited medical care they offer the animals sheltered there.


There is an attic in the new area that is also used for storage and was properly insulated. And the front of the new area has a small outdoor cage where animals can be placed when their kennels are being cleaned. "M&M Recycling built the cage for us and it works perfectly," Joe shared.


With all the new changes, modifications and additions, the Cut Bank Animal Shelter no longer looks like the garage it was back in the early 1940s. It is a nice space and hopefully only a temporary holding area for the dogs and cats needing to be placed back in their original homes or in a new home.



 


Volunteer Work Keeps Her Dog Gone Busy at Animal Shelter



By Linda Bruch for the Cut Bank Pioneer Press
Wednesday, April 19, 2006 5:17 PM MDT

This week is National Volunteer Week and the choices to feature an outstanding local volunteer are countless. Webster defines a volunteer as: "A person who enters or offers to enter into any service of his/her own free will." He could just as easily have defined it in two words, Tina Gauthier.


Gauthier works 40 plus hours a week, all volunteer, at the Cut Bank Animal Shelter, but that is just one of the volunteer "jobs" Gauthier has. The tireless work she does at the shelter includes making arrangements for adoptions into and out of the shelter, taking photos of the adopted animals and posting them on different websites. She also maintains the Cut Bank Animal Shelter and the Cut Bank Police Department's websites, all as a volunteer.


While she is involved in lots of other volunteer projects, Gauthier's first love is for the animals. "Animals have no voices. Someone needs to champion their cause," Gauthier said.


Born into a farmer/rancher family, she grew up with the concept the animals were fed before the humans. "My dad ran over 200 head of registered Black Angus cattle. We also had horses, kitty-cats and dogs," said Gauthier. Her love for animals has been a part of her since she can remember.


Gauthier's husband, Joe, is the Animal Control Officer for the City of Cut Bank and shares his wife's love of animals. "We are kind of a team, Joe and I," declared Gauthier. Their work and devotion to the animal shelter has helped earn it the reputation of being a "low kill" shelter. This means they work like "cats and dogs" to find homes for all the animals placed at the shelter. The only animals put down are those that are unhealthy or un-adoptable due to irreversible temperament issues. Animals are never put down due to lack of room at the shelter.


When a dog arrives at the shelter, the husband and wife team verify its temperament and determine how adoptable the animal may be. Once the green light is given, Gauthier gets to work trying to find a home for the dog. She enters the dog into their animal shelter log and then starts checking the internet sites they use to see where the dog might find a new, safe home. This in itself could take hours and days to accomplish. However, if all goes well, the end result will be the animal will have found a good home. When that happens, Gauthier believes the time and energy was worth it.


"We'll do whatever it takes to find that dog a good home," said Gauthier. "Sometimes we run a leg of a transport to get a dog adopted. We've had good success in finding homes for the dogs left at the animal shelter."


All of this keeps this volunteer busy enough, but Gauthier also answers and responds to the animal shelter's phone and emails. "The shelter phone is our house phone," Gauthier admits.


If you thought that was the end of her super-volunteering efforts, think again. In a nutshell, Gauthier has tutored students, organized a McGruff House program, conducted a neighborhood watch program and provided care for several elderly women. She has also applied for grants to keep the animal shelter and other programs up and functional, does web design, provides a dog obedience training course, compiles data from shelters around the state and enters it into the computer for match-up purposes and transports dogs to a spay and neuter clinic in Havre and Great Falls.


"I have the just do it, kind of attitude," proclaimed Gauthier.


That kind of attitude has made Gauthier the wonderful volunteer that she is.




Cut Bank Animal Shelter Reunites Pets With Owners, Finds New Homes For Animals


By Melissa Paul, Western Breeze Staff Writer Published Tuesday, June 28, 2005


Lost and bewildered, a dog was found at the summit parking lot at Glacier National Park and ended up in the care of the Cut Bank Animal Shelter. Animal Control Officer, Joseph Gauthier and his wife, Tina, a shelter volunteer, made it their mission to locate the dog's owner. Through the animal's identification, he was traced to a Washington man who was hiking the park. Joe and Tina sent word in with the pack company that was resupplying the hiker on his trek across the park that his pet was safe and sound and in the care of the shelter. Owner and dog were reunited a few weeks later. This is just one of many happy endings for animals that find themselves at the Cut Bank Animal Shelter. The shelter has started scanning all dogs coming in for microchips using equipment donated by AVID. Microchips serve as a permanent, invisible dog tags and microchipped animals can be traced back to their owners if they become lost and end up at the shelter. In addition to reuniting lost dogs with their owners, the shelter also finds homes for surrendered, abandoned and stray animals. "In 2004, 52 dogs and 20 cats were placed in loving homes. So far we've adopted 96 dogs and 43 cats to loving homes. It may not sound like a lot but we are proud of the numbers," said Tina.


The Cut Bank Animal Shelter charges a nominal adoption fee to adopt an animal and the animal control officer checks the home of a prospective owner. "Most of the animals that come into our program have either been abandoned, neglected, abused or surrendered for some reason or another. We do not want to see these animals suffer again. This next move in their lives needs to be a permanent one, their "for always" home," Tina said. "Dogs will be part of the family, not chained outside, and homes need to have an adequately fenced yard, large kennel or trolley."


"The State requires that all animals adopted from a shelter by spayed or neutered," reminded Tina. "We have all new owners provide with a certificate from their veterinarian within 30 days of adopting an animal. We do have some assistance available for low income people, though and we welcome spay/neuter donations, too."


"We sanitize with bleach on a daily basis and all the animals are current on their shots before they are adopted out," Tina said. Tina volunteers much of her time posting the shelter's animals on the internet on the at www.cutbankairport.org/cbshelter and at www.petfinder.org. "The internet has really expanded our horizons," Tina remarked. "We have people adopting pets from our shelter from all over." Tina also posts adoptable animals for other animal rescue organizations. "We all try to work together and help each other out," she said. "The Cascade County Humane Society has been a tremendous help to our shelter with food, adoption forms and all kinds of things. It's great the shelters help each other." Along those lines, sometimes an animal needs to be transported between shelters or to a new home in another area. The Gauthiers participate in a pet rescue transportation program. Volunteers will take an animal for a leg of the journey, sometimes a few hundred miles and hand the pet off to another volunteer. "One of our special needs adoptions, a tripod [three legged dog] was transported this way," Tina added.


Tina has also been the driving force behind fund-raising efforts at the shelter. Last year, she applied for five grants and the Cut Bank Animal Shelter was awarded two. A $1,000 grant from PetCo and $5,000 from IAMS and the Helen Woodward Animal Coalition through their Home for the Holidays program. "It was a onetime only grant, but the Cut Bank Shelter was one of only 20 to receive the grant." The shelter has also had items donated such as heated water bowls and pet beds. "We always can use donations, even things people can pick up at the grocery store, like bleach, hand sanitizer and dog toys. Every gift is appreciated, no matter how big or small," said Tina. The gift of time is also welcome. "We love our volunteers," she commented. "We have puppies and kittens that need socialization and anyone who wants to come and walk dogs or play with the little ones are encouraged to come."


The Cut Bank Animal Shelter is a 501(c)3 organization and all donations are tax deductible. Dog and cat food, puppy and kitten food, kitten milk replacer, bones and treats, bleach, hand sanitizer and kitty litter are also needed. Have an old ink cartridge? Don't throw it out, give it to the dogs. The shelter participates in a program called Cash for Critters, recycling used ink jet and laser cartridges and cell phones. $100 has been received for vaccinations from this program. "We also could use stuffed animals for socializing the puppies. They smell like people and a great tool," Tina added. Appointments to visit the Cut Bank Animal Shelter to see the animals can be made with the Animal Control Officer or Special Services Officer by made by calling 406-873-4624. More information is also available on the shelter's websites or by emailing Tina at cutbankanimalshelter@hotmail.com.



OBEDIENCE CLASSES


ATTENTION: On September 7-8, 2013 and September 14-15, 2013 on Saturday and Sunday afternoon from 1 p.m. - 3:00 p.m., Joe Gauthier, former K-9 handler for the City of Cut Bank, held dog obedience classes on the south side of A. J. Park by the tennis courts on the northwest side of Cut Bank. The lessons were free to the public and were taught through Adult Education classes. In 2014, classes will be taught in September.


Rainy days, snowstorms or extremes in temperature can ruin your plans to go outside with your dog and play fetch, run in the park or just spend time together outdoors, but your dog needs to have exercise and socialization. To make matters worse, your dog can become restless or bored and begin to act out for attention.


As the cold weather begins, people are less inclined to spend time outside. People still need to exercise with your dog. Walk, run or play! It is great for your dog and good for you, too. Your dog or pup needs to learn to socialize with other dogs.


It is Joe's wish that all adopters and the general public attend the classes. "The dogs will be learning basic obedience: sit, stay, stand, lay down and heel." Any dog owners who need refresher course are also welcome to attend.


Socializing, training, exercising and loving our animals are the most valuable things that we can give our animals. It instills a sense of confidence and self-esteem into a pet, so that the animal will be more personable and secure in their surroundings.


If you or your dog needs to brush up on training, now is the perfect time to plan ahead and sign up for classes. You can register at the first class. Please be sure that all dogs and pups are up to date with their vaccinations. Please bring a lawn chair. See you in September.


Don't worry if you miss one class. Joe retrains the missed class with you, so that you will be right in step with the other class members. The only requirement is your dog, you and time.


Here are some photos of the lessons that will be taught:



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Dog Gone Walk 2013


Dog Gone Walk 2013 was a walk benefiting Cut Bank Animal Shelter on Sunday, May 5, 2013. The walk is a 1.5 mile flat walk. Dogs and their owners made our last walk as a completion of last spring's Dog Obedience class and invite the community owners and their dogs to join them in a walk to celebrate. We look forward to the Dog Gone Walk 2013.


2:00 p.m. Registration on the south side of A.J. Park, next to the tennis courts on the northwest side of Cut Bank.


3:00 p.m. Start on the south side of A.J. Park, next to the tennis courts on the northwest side of Cut Bank.


Humans and canines are welcome. Pets receive bandanas. Pet owners are responsible for cleaning up after & maintaining control of their pets. All dogs must be leashed. Aggressive dogs & dogs in heat should not participate.


Entry fee=$5.00 per dog/walker; $10.00 per family.


We will be selling Magnetic Ribbons; Clickers; Stuffed Squeaky Toys; Dog Clothes; and Beanie Babies. Prices range from $2.50 up.


All funds are donated to the Cut Bank Animal Shelter Medical Fund and are a tax free donation.


Stand by Your Shelter -- Every day, Cut Bank Animal Shelter struggles with pet overpopulation and small budgets to help animals in our area. Come join the fun and help an animal, while you are doing it.


Dog Gone Walk 2013 Map and Registration Form



WHO WE ARE

Joe Gauthier Becomes New Animal Control Officer
By LACY GILLESPIE
Cut Bank Pioneer Press
June 2, 2004

"It is fun getting back," Joe Gauthier said. Gauthier is not a stranger to the Cut Bank community by any means. He served on the Cut Bank Police force for 30 years, and upon retiring, he worked at Crossroads Correctional (CCA) in Shelby for five years. He is now back serving Cut Bank as the animal control officer and enforcing city ordinances.


Gauthier was a part of the police force in the 1960s when the animal control method was quarantine. "Every six months the city went under quarantine, and we would pick up the stray dogs. The city felt it wasn't enough," he said. The community decided to enact city ordinances allowing Gauthier and other city officers to more strictly control the flow of animals.


Now in his first three weeks in the saddle with his new job, he is making improvements for the Cut Bank Animal Shelter and the way animals are handled. Gauthier along with his wife are working to model the shelter after the Great Falls Animal Shelter. They each take turns walking the dogs at the shelter and through their interaction they are able to determine the animal's personality. In addition, Gauthier is working on obedience training with the dogs. By taking the regular shelter activities a step further, it is easier for them to adopt their animals out.



Gauthier's wife, Tina, is taking an active role in expanding the shelter's capabilities to adopt animals. The shelter's websites, Cut Bank Shelter's page on Montana Pets on the Net, Cut Bank Shelter on Petfinder.org, and Cut Bank Animal Shelter on the Cut Bank Airport site, have listings of pets available at the shelter, descriptions of pets wanted and lost pets. These site gives statewide and national coverage and helps match pets and potential new owners. To post on these website, send Tina an email at cutbankanimalshelter@hotmail.com.

She will then list it online. "The more people we reach, the better the success rate at the shelter," she said. "These are just little heroes waiting for a permanent, loving home. This facility is all about the unsung heroes," she said.


To avoid losing a pet, Gauthier suggests keeping them in a fenced yard or kennel rather than on a chain. Problems tend to occur when an animal is set loose in the morning or evening and makes a mess on another's property or scares someone Gauthier said.


Another component of the shelter is encouraging pet owners to spay and neuter their pets. Leaving a cat or dog unspayed can have serious consequences. For example, an unspayed female cat, her mate and all of their offspring producing just two litters per year with 2.8 kittens surviving on average from each litter would add up to 67,000 cats in six years. Similarly, in nine years a female dog, her mate and all of their puppies would produce 66,088 dogs in six years. To prevent these problems, owners may start spaying/neutering their pets as early as 12 weeks.



ADOPTING A FRIEND

Most of the animals that come into our program have either been abandoned, neglected, abused or surrendered for some reason or another. We do not want to see these animals suffer again. This next move in their lives needs to be a permanent one -- their "for always" home.


Animals need adopted primarily as household companion animals only. No dogs will be placed as attack dogs. Dogs will be part of the family and not chained outside. The math about an indoor cat's life span at 14 years; outdoor cat's lifespan is 18 months*. Based on national statistics.


Montana State Law requires that all canines and felines adopted from a shelter or pound be altered. All dogs and cats adopted from the Animal Shelter will be spayed or neutered at their new owners expense unless they are of such a young age it isn't healthy. At the time of the adoption, a contract will be signed that the animal will be altered within 30 days. All adopters must be 18 years or older. Identification is required to adopt any pet. Animals must NOT be transported in the back of an open vehicle without some form of restraint, ie. a kennel or leash.


We encourage all family members to be present at the time of adoption. All household members must want this pet.


No dog will be released for adoption unless the adopter can provide an adequately fenced yard, have a trolley system or a large enough kennel that the dog is willing to eliminate in that area. Dogs MUST have some form of restraint when outdoors unattended.


MISSING YOUR FURRY FRIEND

Call 406-873-2288 or email us at cutbankanimalshelter@hotmail.com. We will put the information on the websites for others to view. A safe reunion between friend and family is our goal. The sooner our missing friend is listed; the faster we can look for results.


MEMORIALS

REMEMBER A FRIEND WITH A MEMORIAL

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In Memory of:

Send acknowledgment of my memorial gift to my memorial gift to:

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Cut Bank Animal Shelter is an organization that is exempt from tax under section 501(a)13 - A governmental unit or affiliate of a governmental unit described in Rev. Proc. 95-48, 1995-2 C.B.418. CBAS is eligible to receive charitable contributions as a governmental unit described in Section 170(c)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code. The following categories of organization are included in Section 170(c)(1)" a state, a U.S. possession, a state or local governmental unit which is a municipal corporation or which has been delegated the right to exercise part of a sovereign power of the governmental unit, the United States, the District of Columbia, and Indian tribal governments. Contributions to CBAS are tax-deductible. Cut Bank Animal Shelter wants to thank you for your generous donation! Without your help and support, our shelter would not be able to adopt other animals in a loving forever home. It is with deepest honor that we accept your help in saving our community's animals.

Return to: Cut Bank Animal Shelter, 113 East Main, Cut Bank, MT 59427-2918



COME VISIT US!

Appointments to visit with the Animal Control Officer and the Shelter animals can be made by calling 406-391-2273 or emailing us at cutbankanimalshelter@hotmail.com . We look forward to meeting you.


Cut Bank Animal Shelter
113 East Main
Cut Bank, MT 59427
Phone: (406) 873-2288 24/7
Fax: (406) 873-2096

Email: cutbankanimalshelter@hotmail.com
Click here for a list of pets at this shelter
Website updated 9/9/2014




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